Essential Bash Commands

I am constantly amazed when I search for bash commands and get page after page of terminal shortcuts or linux commands like cat, ls, and set.

Having said the above, my list of essential bash commands:

Moving a Primary Partition to an Extended Partition

This article explains how to move a primary (root) partition to an extended partition. There are several ways this task can be performed; however, I chose to keep my system generally intact, introduce minimal changes, and use no external storage (other than a SD card for the LiveCD).

I had a disk layout as follows:

Mount Truecrypt Container with cryptsetup

Truecrypt is a great multiplatform encryption tool; however, there have been numerous claims of it not being as secure as people think. There were so many claims that an IndieGoGo project was set up to fund a full (external) security audit of truecrypt (status: http://istruecryptauditedyet.com/). This, along with other concerns I have had with truecrypt caused me to look for an alternative, which lead me back to LUKS.

Linux RSS Reader Comparison

I was looking for a light RSS reader. Unlike many out there today, I was not looking for a Google Reader replacement. I wanted a stand-a-lone app that didn't take a lot of system resources to run and was not screen intrusive.

Conky Python Mt.Gox Ticker

The Mt.Gox Ticker script grabs the current price, high, low, and volume of Bitcoin from the money ticker JSON API from Mt.Gox via a simple python helper script.

Removing and/or Cleaning Up Old Kernels

This post shows how to remove (clean up) old kernels. Old kernels (to me) are defined as kernels that are installed on your system but no longer needed/used.

You can use a package manager (such as synaptic) to remove old kernels, simply search for linux-image or linux-headers that are installed and remove them. Also of importance is to note that you should remove old kernels and headers together as one is not useful without the other in most circumstances.

Changing the Auto-Logout Timeout in SSH

The ssh "timed out waiting for input: auto-logout" messages is generated by ssh upon reaching a auto-logout after an inactivity time specified by the TMOUT environment variable. If this variable is not set your session will not be auto-logged out due to inactivity. If the environment variable is set, your session will be automatically closed/logged out after the amount of seconds specified by the TMOUT variable.

To see if your auto-logout variable is set and/or see what it is set to issue the following command:
 $ echo $TMOUT

Desktop Apps Replacing Prism With...

I have used Mozilla's Prism (previously Webrunner and now Webrunner again) for years to create an run web pages as a desktop app but, unfortunately, Mozilla has discontinued Prism and handed the code over to an individual for any future development. Needless to say, development is slow if progressing at all and most distros (including Ubuntu) have removed Prism from the repos. This left me with a rather large gap in needed functionality so I did some research.

Multiboot Disk Partition Layout

As stated on other pages (re: Fix Broken Bootloader), my primary computer (laptop) has a multiboot setup; a triple boot using Xubuntu, LMDE, and Crunchbang. This article discusses the partition layout I use for this setup, actually my partition layout is more or less a generic linux disk layout multiplied by three due to the three OSes.

General Disk Layout

For a general linux disk layout, I use the following partition setup (in the order specified):

Guide to Using Guarddog as a Firewall

UPDATE: guarddog is very outdated and requires pulling in too many dependencies, I recommend ipkungfu as a replacement.

I highly recommend using a local (or sometimes referred to as a 'soft-firewall') on any  personal computer, be it windows, mac, or linux. This guide provides a few basic concepts for using Guarddog as a local firewall.